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Relief for Gluten Intolerance with GluteGuard

When most people think of gluten containing foods they think wheat, bread, pasta, and grains like rye, oats and barley, etc. But there are so many common products we don’t realise contain gluten that can cause symptoms – soy sauce (Tamari sauce is a GF soy alternative), other sauces, marinades, dressings and seasonings (as they often use wheat flour to thicken), malt (including most beer, malt vinegar, Milo, etc.), Brewer’s Yeast, pre-made soups, processed meat and deli meats, some supplements and medications. Sometimes products containing glucose syrup, starch and dextrin are also made from wheat products (it should state this on the label). Not to mention cross contamination of gluten in kitchens, particularly when eating out or travelling when you are unsure of what you are eating. This is why it’s a good reason to consume a wholefoods diet free of processed and packaged products if you need to avoid gluten.

If you’ve read my blog and recipes before you will notice that 95% of my recipes are gluten free (GF) and I follow a gluten free diet as I am highly gluten intolerant/sensitive (any of my non-GF recipes are made for others). From my experience and hearing from other people with gluten intolerance/sensitivity I’ve found that we all have different limitations when it comes to consuming gluten. Some can afford small amounts of good quality gluten in their diet such as slow fermented sourdough bread, whilst others like me can’t have any at all, not even small amounts, and adhere to a gluten free diet all the time.

How many of my GF friends here have eaten out and chosen a GF meal only to experience symptoms?? You have to really check labels, look for “Gluten Free” products and learn about what ingredients are gluten containing as its not always obvious.

Recently I was introduced to a new natural supplement – GluteGuard – which I have been trialling. I was so excited to find out about this as its such a breakthrough for gluten sensitive people worldwide and I am so excited to share this with you!

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What is Gluten?

Gluten is a family of protein molecules (called glutenin and gliadin, or avenin in oats) found in many grains such as wheat, barley, rye and others. These particular protein peptides can be difficult to breakdown and digest, and some people find it causes digestive discomfort and symptoms such as bloating, cramps, gas, changes in bowel habits, nausea, or fatigue.

How does GluteGuard work? 

GluteGuard is a world-first innovative dietary supplement aimed at providing symptom relief for anyone suffering from gluten sensitivity. GluteGuard contains caricain which is a natural enzyme in Carica papaya fruit that was found (through Australian clinical research) to help breakdown gluten peptides during digestion. This helps alleviate symptoms of gluten ingestion. Important note from the GluteGuard website: “If you follow a gluten-free diet you should continue to strictly adhere to it. GluteGuard is an adjunct to a gluten-free diet, not a replacement.” It is not a treatment for Celiac disease.

My Experience: 

I’ve been taking a GluteGuard tablet each time I eat out or at family and friends gatherings as a “just in case” as so far it has worked! I chose gluten free meals where possible, but occasionally there may be cross contamination or hidden gluten I didn’t realise at the time (or didn’t check properly), or I have “tasted” some of my partner or friends food which contained gluten. I’ve taken a GluteGuard tablet with my meal and not had any digestive discomfort or symptoms such as bloating and cramps. This has been such a great supplement for me! Please remember that this is my experience and everyone is different.

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Head over to the GluteGuard website to find out more and to order (they ship worldwide!). They also have an inspiring ‘Gluten Free Community‘ page on their site where you can find helpful info, read experiences from others or share your story, and gluten free recipes including some of my own favourites from my blog. And yes that’s me in the behind the scenes video a the bottom of the page sharing my tips for other gluten intolerant people 🙂

If you would like some further reading on the studies, please see my reference list below.

I’d love to hear from you and your experiences or if you have tried GluteGuard, so please feel free to email or message me on IG @balanced.body.nutrition or BBN’s Facebook page and share your experience in the comments below.

I hope you will love this supplement as much as I do!

Tris xx

Disclaimer:  This site and the information on it is completely based upon the extensive research, own experiences and opinions of Balanced Body Nutrition’s author, Tristen Van Der Kley, unless otherwise stated or referenced. This site is not in any way meant for purposes of diagnosis or treatment of health conditions, and it is not designed to replace dietary or health advice by your qualified health care practitioner. This site is meant for information purposes only and is intended to motivate and encourage readers to make healthy dietary and lifestyle choices. It is the responsibility of the visitor to do research and consult with qualified health professionals before making dietary and lifestyle changes or using any products mentioned on this site.

References:

https://glutagen.com/

Cornell, H. J. (2016). Can dietary enzyme supplements aid people with coeliac disease? Australian Coeliac, The, 27-29.

Cornell, H. J. , Czyzewska, A. , Macrae, F. A. , Rydzewska, G. , Nasierowska-Gutmejer, A. , Bednarczuk, A. , & Stelmasiak, T. (2016). The Effect of Enzyme Supplementation on Symptoms and Duodenal Histology in Celiac Patients. International Journal of Celiac Disease, 4(2), 40-47.

Cornell, H.J., Doherty, W. & Stelmasiak, T. Amino Acids (2010) 38: 155. doi:10.1007/s00726-008-0223-6

Cornell, H., MacRae, F., Melny, J., Pizzey, C., Cook, F., Mason, S., … Stelmasiak, T. (2005). Enzyme therapy for management of coeliac disease. Scandinavian Journal Of Gastroenterology, 40(11), 1304-1312.

Cornell HJ, & Townley RR. (1974). The toxicity of certain cereal proteins in coeliac disease. Gut, 15(11), 862-9.

http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=george&dbid=380

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